How To Pay For Rehab

One of the biggest challenges of attending a drug rehab is finding a way to pay for treatment. While many individuals out there are desperate for addiction treatment to help them with their substance abuse issues, many addiction treatment programs can be costly.

If you’re struggling with substance abuse, don’t let paying for rehab deter you from seeking treatment. There are many resources out there that can help you or a loved one pay for rehab. As you explore your options, you can determine what treatment facility is best for you. 

Required Treatment for Your Needs

The first step to take to determine if you can afford addiction treatment is figuring out what kind of addiction treatment you need. There are various types of addiction treatment programs available to choose from. Different programs will have different costs associated with them.

Treatment Options

The type of treatment option you need depends on how severe your addiction is along with other factors. If you are dealing with a mild addiction, an outpatient program could be enough to help you overcome your substance abuse. If your addiction is more serious, and you might experience severe withdrawal symptoms that require medication and observation, inpatient treatment with detox is the best option for you. 

Inpatient treatment

When you undergo inpatient treatment, you will live at the treatment facility. This is a residential form of treatment. One of the biggest benefits to inpatient treatment is you remove yourself from your surroundings that helped fuel your addiction. You will also have only one thing to focus on during inpatient treatment: getting and staying sober. The normal temptations aren’t available during inpatient treatment. This treatment is more costly than outpatient because of its residential nature. 

Outpatient treatment

Outpatient treatment tends to cost less than inpatient treatment because you don’t live at an outpatient facility. You’ll attend individual and group therapy sessions here, just like you would during inpatient. The difference between the two is you aren’t putting your life on hold while participating in outpatient treatment. You will live at your house, have all of the same personal responsibilities, and even go to work. The downside to this is you have less time during the day to focus on recovery, the upside is you’ll easily learn how to incorporate recovery into everyday life.  

Exploring Funding options

Once you have determined what type of treatment you’d like to pursue, you can explore your options for funding the cost of addiction treatment. 

Private health insurance

Private health insurance can cover a portion or all of your addiction treatment costs, depending on your plan. If you have a particularly good health insurance plan, all of the costs of treatment will be covered. To find out if your insurance covers addiction treatment, you can reach out to them over the phone. You can also call the rehab you want to attend to get your insurance verified (they’ll let you know if they accept it or not). . 

Employer assistance

If you’re currently employed, you can see if your company provides employer assistance. If you feel comfortable doing so, consult with the human resources office of your employer to look into any funding available for rehab treatment for employees. Any don’t worry about potentially losing your job after confiding in HR about your addiction, according to the FMLA, it’s illegal to be fired when pursuing addiction treatment. 

Medicare or Medicaid

Both Medicare and Medicaid offer some coverage for rehab treatment. If you are on Medicare or Medicaid, look into the details of your policy. You should have at least partial coverage for rehab. However, the extent of any coverage that your plan includes depends on which parts of Medicare coverage you have or which state you live in when it comes to Medicaid. 

State governmental programs

Some state grants are allocated toward covering the costs of addiction treatment. These programs are frequently provided in connection with a state’s judicial system. This means that you’re especially likely to be eligible for state governmental programs if you are having legal problems as the result of drug or alcohol addiction. 

Cash pay

If you don’t have insurance or access to programs that help pay for rehab, you can pay out of pocket, although this is rare. If you are looking to pay for rehab yourself, you can call the facility you’d like to go to and ask the cash pay price. 

We’re Here To Help

Newport Beach Recovery Center is here to help you with your addiction. You can verify your insurance benefits through our website or by giving us a call. Please don’t wait to reach out for help, it’s time you get your life back from addiction! 

Why You Should Attend a Medical Detox

medical detox

The best way to get started on the road to recovery from drug addiction is to undergo detox at a professional treatment facility. Unfortunately, many individuals struggling with drug abuse attempt to undergo detox on their own and are unsuccessful at attaining sobriety. It can also be incredibly dangerous to detox on your own as certain withdrawal symptoms are very severe.

Sometimes addicts will attempt to detox themselves because of financial limitations, embarrassment, or they think it won’t be that hard.  Newport Beach Recovery Center is here to let you know you shouldn’t detox by yourself. You have a much better chance of getting and staying sober by going to a professional detox program. 

What Is Medical Detox

Detox treatment for drug and alcohol abuse consists of clearing toxins out of the body that have resulted from substance abuse. A major focus of detoxification treatment is overcoming withdrawal symptoms that occur when you stop using drugs or alcohol. While detox and withdrawal can be difficult, we do everything we can at Newport Beach Recovery Center to make you feel safe and comfortable.

Detox is generally considered to be the first step in overcoming drug or alcohol addiction. After our clients go through detox, they move on to our residential inpatient treatment program. 

How Medical Detox Works

Before you’re able to undergo detox, we collect and review your substance abuse and medical history. It’s important we’re fully aware of the substances you are currently addicted to, how long you’ve been using them, and how frequently. All of these factors will help determine how long your detox will be and what the process is. On average our detox process lasts about 4-7 days. During detox, we monitor your health very closely. Depending on what substances you use, withdrawals can be mild to severe. 

Common withdrawal symptoms experienced amongst all addicts are nausea, anxiety, depression, an overall feeling of being sick, fatigue, and insomnia. These are not out of the ordinary as your body is now adjusting to functioning without drugs or alcohol. 

Benefits of Medical Detox

One of, if not the biggest, benefit to medical detox is being under the care of medical professionals while you go through withdrawals. Some withdrawals can be fatal so you definitely shouldn’t detox on your own. Other benefits include: 

Medicine is prescribed to manage withdrawals. 

During detox, we prescribe certain medications that help ease withdrawal symptoms. If you try to detox on your own at home, you won’t have access to these kinds of medications. It’s also important to wean the body off drugs instead of stopping cold turkey because you can completely shock your system. The “comfort meds” we prescribe are given to you in a controlled setting so you won’t be able to take them whenever you want. 

Therapists and counselors are here to help. 

Our experienced staff is available to answer any questions you may have during detox. If you start to experience any anxiety or feelings of depression, our staff can help. We know it’s crucial for those detoxing to have mental health support as detoxing affects the body and mind. 

Support from like-minded people. 

Aside from the support of our medical staff, it’s important to have the support from other addicts as well during detox. Detoxing at home alone is solitary. Being alone can aggravate some common symptoms of withdrawal such as depression and anxiety. With medical detox, our clients can help encourage, motivate, and keep an eye on you, which creates a supportive environment.

Detox Medically With Us

Newport Beach Recovery Center can help you overcome your addiction. We offer comprehensive detoxification, residential treatment, and outpatient treatment options. Detoxing is the first step to take on the road of recovery and once you accomplish that, we can help you with the next step! Contact us today to learn more about our program. 

Signs of Drug Addiction in Women

Research relating to addiction is often focused on men, primarily because earlier researchers generally assumed that addiction was mostly a male problem or that women with drug addiction have the same experiences as men have. However, there are significant environmental and biological factors; an addiction in women is so significantly different that it affects the way their treatment is approached. Not only is the approach to addiction treatment different for women than in men, but the signs of addiction in women may also be different. Here are some of the signs of drug addiction in women.

Physical Signs of Drug Addiction in Women

It’s important to note that drug addiction can affect women from all walks of life. The first step to identifying if a female in your life has an addiction problem is though physical signs. If you notice any of the following signs, it’s essential that ask them straightforward questions, including “are you using drugs”? If you suspect a drug addiction, it’s important to encourage them to seek addiction treatment immediately. Physical signs of an addiction to drugs may include:

  • Bloodshot eyes
  • Dilated or pinpoint pupils
  • Sudden weight changes, either weight gain or weight loss
  • Difficulty walking, tremors and/or slurred speech
  • Overly energetic, increased alertness or hyperactivity
  • Lethargy
  • Change in sleep patterns
  • Marks on the skin
  • Frequent picking at or itching of the skin

Behavioral Signs of Drug Addiction in Women

If you haven’t witnessed the person in question using drugs or you have seen the physical signs of addiction, but you still suspect drug abuse, there are behavioral changes that may indicate addiction. It is important, however, to keep in mind that everyone’s behaviors often change for different reasons. For instance, the behaviors of a teenage girl may change as they transfer into adulthood. With that said, drug addiction can cause a wide range of behavioral changes in women, including:

  • Lack of motivation at work, school or home
  • Decrease in concern for personal hygiene and appearance
  • Increase in impulsive risks
  • Frequently borrowing money without an explanation
  • Changes and/or problems in relationships
  • Loss of interest in activities they once enjoyed
  • Withdrawing from social circles, friends, and family
  • Unexplained accidents, isolation or secrecy
  • Avoiding conversations and hiding things

Psychological Signs of Drug Addiction in Women

Teenage girls are notorious for their moodiness and personality changes, but extreme changes in their demeanor is often a sign of drug or alcohol use, especially in adult females. Many of the psychological signs of drug addiction are short-term, but with ongoing use, it can lead to long-term emotional and mental effects in women. Some of the common psychological signs of addiction in women may include:

  • Hallucinations or delusions
  • Increased confusion
  • Concentration difficulties
  • Short-term memory is diminished
  • Increased aggressiveness, hostility and belligerence
  • Sudden symptoms of a co-occurring disorder, such as depression, anxiety or paranoia
  • Loss of control
  • Compulsive drug cravings
  • Inability to stop drug use due to psychological dependence

Studies have shown that women are more prone to developing a drug addiction through less use of the drug than men. Women also tend to experience more social consequences, and they have a more difficult time quitting as well as a higher risk of relapse. This is due in part to the way women respond to stress. Women are also more likely than men to relapse into drug use in response to stress triggers. Unfortunately, women are also less likely to seek addiction treatment. The reason for this is because there is much more stigma attached to women and substance abuse. There is addiction treatment available that is designed specifically for women, which treats both the addiction as well as any co-occurring disorders. If you know a female that is suffering with drug addiction, it is essential for their life to encourage them to seek treatment as soon as possible.

The Benefits To An Outpatient Program

With an outpatient program for addiction treatment, patients can attend treatment while also having time to do everything else that is important to them. Whether it is taking care of family, going to work or taking classes, outpatient therapy can serve as a great way to get addiction treatment without having to stay at a rehabilitation center.

What are the benefits of outpatient programs?

These programs offer many advantages in comparison to other forms of addiction treatment.

  • Flexibility to find a program that works best with your schedule. Outpatient addiction treatments have a range of options that fit into your life. Some of these programs include group therapy, day treatment and even family therapy.
  • More cost-effective than residential programs. Since you do not have to pay for meals and overnight accommodations, these addiction treatment programs are typically less expensive than inpatient options.
  • Build a network of support from others in addiction treatment who can hold you accountable when not in outpatient programs. Having support from others in your addiction program who can relate to what you are going through can be helpful. It can definitely help to build a community of people who understand your struggles and temptations because they have been there, too.
  • Do not have to worry about taking off work or school, or rejecting other activities while in an outpatient program. Because outpatient treatments are on your schedule, there is room in your life to still work or attend classes while in addiction treatment. Plus the ability to stay in contact with your social network can lower stress, which is incredibly important as you battle addiction.
  • Living in the real world while also attending addiction treatment. One of the most difficult parts for patients who graduate in an inpatient program is returning to the real world. By doing an outpatient program, addiction is managed while also dealing with external factors and threats to recovery.

Who benefits from outpatient programs?

Outpatient addiction programs can be a great asset for many people. Addictions can vary, but outpatient treatment can be a tool for any of them. Besides the person battling addiction, there are other people who can benefit from outpatient programs.

  • Employers. If a person can get treatment in the evenings, employers will not have to worry about replacing someone during business hours. Plus, this helps the employee not have to use paid-time-off.
  • Families. You will not have to miss your child’s soccer game. You can be there on the weekends. You can see your family. Going to an outpatient program means that you do not have to wait for your family to visit you in order to spend time with them. You are able to live your life, while also getting help for your addiction. Plus there are also opportunities for families to be a part of the treatment process with family counseling and therapy, to provide your loved ones with the resources to know how to talk to you and support you through your recovery.
  • Friends. With an outpatient recovery program, friends can see you as you get treatment for addiction. There is not a wait or an awkward pause between getting treated and seeing your friends. This is a process that friends can benefit from since they can be a part of the journey and watch as you go through treatment.
  • Pets. Of course, your fluffiest family members benefit from having your care. Not having to get a sitter to watch your home and pets is a great perk of outpatient addiction treatment.

Why are outpatient programs used?

Outpatient programs can be used as a post-inpatient program to ensure recovery is held accountable. Outpatient programs can also be useful to people who might not have the option to complete residential addiction treatment. Overall, outpatient treatment provides an alternative approach to residency programs, but can also be used as a tool after inpatient addiction treatment is complete.

If you or a loved one are struggling with addiction, don’t be afraid to reach out! Contact us today here at Newport Beach Recovery Center!

Addiction Treatment and Recovery Options – When Do I Need Help?

According to a 2012 survey on addiction and health in the United States, conducted by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, as little as 10 percent of individuals who admit that they are struggling with substance dependence or abuse of some kind have actually received any kind of treatment. This is a terrifying and saddening statistic and is made all the more worrisome when one stops and thinks about the various types of substances people are addicted to.

Lack of Treatment Sought for Addictions

Many people choose to forego any kind of treatment for their addiction disorder because they believe things are not really all that bad and they don’t need any help or treatment yet. They have yet to hit rock bottom or they do not believe that their problem is bad enough to warrant any sort of treatment or intervention. The truth of the matter is: if you’re questioning whether or not you need help getting sober, you likely do. Whether your addiction is related to drugs such as heroin or methamphetamine, prescription medications like Oxycontin or phenylalanines,  or other substances like caffeine or alcohol, it is important that you get treatment for your addiction sooner rather than later!

Understanding Your Addiction and Its Severity

If you are beginning to have problems with your personal life, social interactions, relationships, work or school life, and any other areas of your life because of your substance use, then you probably have an addiction. Addiction is diagnosed on a spectrum and there is a range of various criteria that will be used to determine how bad your addiction is- mild, moderate, or severe. Medical and mental health professionals use eleven criteria to determine if someone is addicted to or abusing a substance:

  • Lack of control over when and where and how much the substance is consumed or used
  • The individual has a desire to quit but has been unable to do so under their own power
  • The individual is spending a lot of time, effort, money, and energy to get the substance
  • Cravings for the substance that begin to interfere with normal activities when not satisfied
  • Lack of responsibility in terms of how much the substance is used or while it’s being used
  • Problems with relationships in personal, romantic, social, work, or school environment
  • No interest in doing things that the individual normally enjoyed for the sake of the substance
  • Dangerous use of the substance repeatedly occurring and concerns and warnings not heeded
  • Worsening situations and a visible decline in health, hygiene, mental sharpness, etc
  • Tolerance develops which requires more of the substance to be consumed for desired effects
  • Withdrawal symptoms and cravings get severe when the substance is withheld

Your Addiction Can Get Worse

Because addiction severity is measured on a spectrum, a diagnosis of a mild addiction may be better than a severe addiction, but it is not a reason to be flippant about getting addiction treatment and help. It’s easy to take an it-could-be-worse approach but it is important to remember that addiction is a progressive disease. If it is not taken seriously and if you not get help sooner rather than later, it will get worse and it will get worse quickly in almost all cases. If you’re only a mild case right now, this is the time to act and seek help before the addiction grows and takes an even stronger hold. Think of it like you would a problem with your car- it might be minor now and not be affecting how the car runs or operates; however if left un-fixed the problem could eventually lead to a serious breakdown of the key part of the car and cause a major accident or render the car useless. Addictions can do the same to your mind and body when left untreated!

Get The Help You Need For Recovery

Addiction is not simply a lifestyle choice or a mistake. While most addictions originate from a poor choice or a bad decision that was made at one point and time, the underlying addiction itself is a chronic disease, and truly is no different than other disease people have to deal with their entire lives like asthma, hypertension, diabetes, cancer and so forth. Someone diagnosed with Stage 1 or 2 cancer would seek help to treat and control their disease.  Someone with diabetes and a blood sugar of 200 would work to take steps to control their disease. Someone with asthma would use their inhaler at the signs of a mild asthma attack rather than waiting for it to get worse. You don’t have to hit rock bottom and be out of all other options before you get help for your addiction. Get help before things get worse and take back your life. Call Newport Beach Recovery of Costa Mesa, CA. Learn more about rehab and how treatments can help you beat your addiction once and for all with the finest recovery program in the area!

The power of Music in Recovery

Music is a cross-cultural experience. You don’t have to understand the words or be familiar with the genre to feel the effects of a superior composition. Music’s ability to change our moods, minds, and behavior is well documented in popular culture. However, the power of music during recovery from addiction is still a newer concept.

Music therapy is a comprehensive treatment system that combines listening, theory, and performance. Adding this therapy to an addiction treatment plan helps patients find relief through some of the most difficult points of their journey while also strengthening them for what lies beyond. How does musical therapy help those fighting through addiction treatment feel better, stay stronger, and recover more quickly?

The Physical Effects of Music

The effects of music aren’t just mental. The mental effects of music cascade throughout the body, producing physical results that can aid the addiction treatment process. These include:

  • Improve communication. Listening to and performing certain genres of music have been proven to increase vital mental skills. A study from the Institute of Music and Mind at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada found that those who use their musical skills frequently show increased activity in the auditory cortex of the brain. This area translates sounds into understandable words and phrases and is vitally connected with our communication skills. Playing instruments can make it easier for patients in treatment to communicate with those who are there to help them.
  • Improved memory and learning. The auditory cortex isn’t the only brain structure positively impacted by music. The prefrontal cortex, which is the seat of our sensory processing abilities, is also improved through performing and listening to music. Over time, patients are able to retain long and short term memories better, which helps them learn new ways of coping with life’s stresses without reaching for a substance.
  • Increased dopamine production. Dopamine is a vital neurotransmitter. Substance abuse damages the body’s ability to naturally produce this substance in useful amounts. Music naturally stimulates dopamine production, which helps even moods, relaxes the body, and calms the mind.

The Mental Effects of Music

Everyone knows how a good piece of music makes them feel. Crashing cymbals, twinkling keyboards, and artfully strummed guitars can lift spirits and stimulate a change of mind. During the recovery process, these effects can be used to the patient’s advantage in many ways.

  • During the detox stage, calming music can help patients cope with the physical and mental stress that comes with the experience. Once the acute stage is passed, playing calming music can help patients keep a level of mood throughout treatment.
  • When the urge to relapse pops up, music can inspire patients to stick with their program. In these cases, upbeat and meaningful tunes are the most effective. Many patients enjoy music with spiritual overtones that help them connect to their higher power for aid.
  • Music can connect support groups. Singing and performing together as a group helps members connect on a safe, emotional level. This facilitates group and private talk therapy sessions. When they’re alone, group members can turn to that piece of music to help them when they can’t reach their support system.

Techniques in Music Therapy

How is music therapy used in the recovery process?

  • Performance. Singing and playing instruments is a physical experience that helps patients work out stress in a healthy way. Keeping your hands and mind busy is a great way to fight the urge to relapse.
  • Meditation. Quietly listening to inspirational tunes while alone is another successful therapy tactic. The right selection can lower blood pressure, relax tense muscles, and help patients cope through difficult stages.
  • Exercise aid. Physical exercise is a well-known technique for resetting the body after detox. Add music to a workout to stay inspired, engaged, and joyfully active through the sweat session.

These techniques can be effective in group or private sessions. Music therapy is also easily adapted into a home practice to support the work outpatients do with their therapists.

Music is more than a pastime. When used consciously and purposefully, it can help those fighting addictions by providing a healthy outlet for many of the negative emotions that can come along with the healing process.  Talk to your addiction treatment specialist about adding music therapy to your program.

Why to Travel to Southern California for Addiction Treatment

Addiction treatment is a nuanced and complicated topic. There are a lot of factors to consider when deciding on the treatment program you are going to commit to. One of the things to consider is whether or not to travel. Travel can help the recovery process in several different ways and traveling to Southern California can be one of the best destinations for people starting or continuing their recovery. Here are five reasons why you should consider traveling for your treatment.

A Change of Scenery

One of the biggest reason to travel to Southern California for treatment is a change of scenery. Addiction isn’t just an isolated phenomenon. It can often be linked to specific places, groups of people, and settings. Staying in recovery long enough to be effective is listed as one of the key factors in success. Sometimes that means a change of scenery. Recovery is a hard process and it can get even harder if you are still in the same area that you struggle with addiction in the first place. Leaving behind that old scene might mean getting away from some of the social pressures that moved you towards addiction in the first place.

 A Fresh Start

As we already mentioned, traveling is a great way to kick of your addiction treatment. Another reason for this is getting a fresh start. Sometimes part of what we need is to break out in some place new. An environment where people aren’t familiar with the old you can be a great place to start, or continue, to heal. Traveling to Southern California for treatment can go a long way to helping you get to a good place in your sobriety. This fresh start isn’t about running away from your problems, but knowing that part of recovery is moving away from your old life and starting something new, sometimes in a new place.

Getting Away from Family

This one might sound a little backward a first. Family is a huge part of recovery and a large motivator for people to stick with their program is getting right with their families. However, there are times in our recoveries were being around family isn’t the best choice for anyone involved. You might decide that you’re early on in your recovery and still need to get right with yourself first. Another reason could be that you’re ready to get back on your feet and striking out on your own is a great way to prove to yourself that you’ve got the strength to do it!

Privacy

For many of us treatment isn’t the most glamorous part of our lives. The added pressure of having family, friends, and coworkers being close to us makes this even more difficult. Traveling to the coastal regions of California can be a great way to get some privacy while you are recovering. Privacy isn’t just about saving yourself from being embarrassed, but being able to focus on your treatment without worrying about any of the social pressures that come with staying in one place for your treatment. Getting to a new location for treatment gives you the clarity you need to get the help you need. The scenery in California isn’t bad either—speaking of!

You Get to Live in Southern California

Addiction treatment isn’t a day spa, but that doesn’t mean you need to suffer through it. In fact, being in a location like SoCal where the weather is uniformly warm and sunny just helps you focus on your recovery all the more. No missing appointments because you got snowed in, after all! Recovery can be an intense process and being in a relaxing and peaceful location, like a stone’s throw from a California beach, can help keep you focussed on getting towards sobriety.  Come join us at Newport Beach Recovery Center in Southern California for the best treatment. Contact us today.

Inpatient vs Outpatient: Which is best?

Addiction treatment is something that doesn’t come in a one-size-fits-all style. When you or your loved one has reached the place where you are ready to heal and move on to a healthier, more fulfilling life, you have some decisions to make regarding where you will seek help. One of these decisions involves whether you will enter an inpatient or outpatient treatment program. Knowing the ups and downs of both types of addiction treatment programs will help you make the best decision for you.

What is Inpatient Treatment?

This is the type of treatment you hear about most often. You are admitted to a facility that literally becomes your world for the duration of the process. The person undergoing treatment may first have to undergo a detox program for a few days at a hospital or other facility where the process is supervised by medical doctors. Some inpatient facilities are able to accommodate you during this time, but you will need to ask if they have that capability. Detox itself is the most dangerous time of addiction treatment physically and undergoing it without medical help is often dangerous. Once the drug or drugs in question are out of your system, the healing process can begin.

Inpatient treatment requires you to live at a facility where you will be scheduled for things like one-on-one counseling, group counseling, recreational activities and more. You will be totally immersed in the recovery process. Decisions such as when to eat and sleep will be made for you. Friends and family will only be able to call or visit during scheduled times. These programs normally last an average of ten weeks but the time can vary.

During an inpatient stay, your entire focus is on recovery and learning the skills that will help you stay strong when you leave.

What is Outpatient Treatment

Outpatient treatment allows you to live in your home and visit a facility several times a week for counseling sessions. These may include individual, group, family counseling, or a combination of these. During outpatient treatment, you are able to continue living in your own home and going to work each day. You maintain your own schedule and decide when to see friends and family. Many times, outpatient treatment will include having someone to call when you feel you may backslide. Before undergoing outpatient treatment, you will likely have to spend a few days in a hospital-type setting to undergo physical detox.

Unlike inpatient treatment, your entire focus will not be on treatment. You will most often continue your job, interact regularly with friends and family and otherwise continue with the responsibilities you normally take on.

So, Which Treatment Option is Best?

Both inpatient and outpatient treatment programs have pros and cons and only you and an intake counselor will be able to determine which is best for your particular situation. Some of the major differences include:

*With inpatient treatment, you are in a completely new environment and surrounded by others who are also undergoing drug rehab. This allows you to be around others who can fully understand what you are going through. The downside is that you have limited contact with friends and family who may be important as part of your support system.

*In outpatient treatment, you are in a familiar environment, can continue the positive routines such as work and parenting, and can regularly access the support of positive friends and family. If, however, this environment or these people are going to expose you to the drugs or alcohol that have been a part of your problem, it can undermine your efforts at healing.

*Some insurances won’t cover the cost of one kind of treatment or another. You will have to find out in advance exactly what your insurance will and won’t cover. Outpatient programs cost less than inpatient ones because they don’t include a room to live in or food. Cost may be a factor in making your decision.

*With inpatient rehab, you are taught new coping skills and ways to replace your addiction with positive activities. When you are discharged, you have the knowledge but must take time practicing these new skills. With outpatient treatment, you will also be given these skills but must practice them immediately. This helps you master the skills earlier, but may also make it more difficult as you are putting them into practice before you may be ready.

Final Thoughts

Talking with an intake person will help you make your decision about which type of program is best for you. Each person has a different set of needs, different severity of the addiction, and different support system, so there is no one program that is perfect for everyone. When you are ready to put addiction behind you, contact Newport Beach Recovery to speak with an intake counselor. We’re waiting for your call.